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Pulse Secure vADC

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A selection of SteelApp security articles, for SteelApp Traffic Manager and SteelApp Web App Firewall. Listed from the most recent to the oldest, let me know if you have other articles to add to this list.   Poodle 2.0:   SteelApp not vulnerable to POODLE 2.0 (CVE 2014-8730) CVE-2014-8730   Poodle:   Disabling SSL v3.0 for SteelApp Re: Assuming TLS, what ciphers does SteelApp 9.8 support? CVE-2014-3566   ShellShock/Bash:   TrafficScript rule to protect against "Shellshock" bash vulnerability (CVE-2014-6271) CVE-2014-6271   Heartbleed:   Heartbleed: Using TrafficScript to detect TLS heartbeat records Would Stingray automatically protect servers from Heartbleed? CVE-2014-0160   Whitepapers:   Global-scale Web Application Security for DOD Why Web Application Firewalls Matter   Miscellaneous Articles:   The "Contact Us" attack against mail servers Protecting against Java and PHP floating point bugs Managing DDoS attacks with Stingray Traffic Manager Enhanced anti-DDoS using TrafficScript, Event Handlers and iptables How to stop 'login abuse', using TrafficScript Bind9 Exploit in the Wild... Protecting against the range header denial-of-service in Apache HTTPD Checking IP addresses against a DNS blacklist with Stingray Traffic Manager SteelApp TrafficManager SAML 2.0 Protocol Validation with TrafficScript
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Web application firewalls (WAF), like Riverbed SteelApp Web Firewall, have a specific purpose: to protect services from attacks that attempt to exploit vulnerabilities in web applications. While general purpose firewalls (both traditional and next-generation) may also provide a degree of such protection, they're typically intended for protecting enterprise networks. WAFs include additional protection capabilities that traditional enterprise firewalls lack, and concentrate these capabilities at the application layer.
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With more services being delivered through a browser, it's safe to say web applications are here to stay. The rapid growth of web enabled applications and an increasing number of client devices mean that organizations are dealing with more document transfer methods than ever before. Providing easy access to these applications (web mail, intranet portals, document storage, etc.) can expose vulnerable points in the network.   When it comes to security and protection, application owners typically cover the common threats and vulnerabilities. What is often overlooked happens to be one of the first things we learned about the internet, virus protection. Some application owners consider the response “We have virus scanners running on the servers” sufficient. These same owners implement security plans that involve extending protection as far as possible, but surprisingly allow a virus sent several layers within the architecture.   SteelApp can extend protection for your applications with unmatched software flexibility and scale. Utilize existing investments by installing SteelApp on your infrastructure (Linux, Solaris, VMWare, Hyper-V, etc.) and integrate with existing antivirus scanners. Deploy SteelApp (available with many providers: Amazon, Azure, CoSentry, Datapipe, Firehost, GoGrid, Joyent, Layered Tech, Liquidweb, Logicworks, Rackspace, Sungard, Xerox, and many others) and externally proxy your applications to remove threats before they are in your infrastructure. Additionally, when serving as a forward proxy for clients SteelApp can be used to mitigate virus propagation by scanning outbound content.   The SteelApp Web Application Firewall ICAP Client Handler provides the possibility to integrate with an ICAP server. ICAP (Internet Content Adaption Protocol) is a protocol aimed at providing simple object-based content vectoring for HTTP services. The Web Application Firewall acts as an ICAP client and passes requests to a specified ICAP server. This enables you to integrate with third party products, based on the ICAP protocol. In particular, you can use the ICAP Client Handler as a virus scanner interface for scanning uploads to your web application.   Example Deployment   This deployment uses version 9.7 of the SteelApp Traffic Manager with open source applications ClamAV and c-icap installed locally. If utilizing a cluster of Traffic Managers, this deployment should be performed on all nodes of the cluster. Additionally, Traffic Manager could be utilized as an ADC to extend availability and performance across multiple external ICAP application servers. I would also like to credit Thomas Masso, Jim Young, and Brian Gautreau Thank you for your assistance!   "ClamAV is an open source (GPL) antivirus engine designed for detecting Trojans, viruses, malware and other malicious threats." - http://www.clamav.net/   "c-icap is an implementation of an ICAP server. It can be used with HTTP proxies that support the ICAP protocol to implement content adaptation and filtering services." - The c-icap project   Installation of ClamAV, c-icap, and libc-icap-mod-clamav   For this example, public repositories are used to install the packages on version 9.7 of the Traffic Manager virtual appliance with the default configuration. To install in a different manner or operating system, consult the ClamAV and c-icap documentation.   Run the following commands (copy and paste) to backup and update sources.list file cp /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.rvbdbackup   Run the following commands to update the sources.list file. *Tested with Traffic Manager virtual appliance version 9.7. For other Ubuntu releases replace the 'precise' with the current version installed. Run "lsb_release -sc" to find out your release. cat <> /etc/apt/sources.list deb http://ch.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise main restricted deb-src http://ch.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise main restricted deb http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise universe deb-src http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise universe deb http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates universe deb-src http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ precise-updates universe EOF   Run the following command to retrieve the updated package lists   apt-get update   Run the following command to install ClamAV, c-icap, and libc-icap-mod-clamav.   apt-get install clamav c-icap libc-icap-mod-clamav   Run the following command to restore your sources.list.   cp /etc/apt/sources.list.rvbdbackup /etc/apt/sources.list   Configure the c-icap ClamAV service   Run the following commands to add lines to the /etc/c-icap/c-icap.conf   cat <> /etc/c-icap/c-icap.conf Service clamav srv_clamav.so ServiceAlias avscan srv_clamav?allow204=on&sizelimit=off&mode=simple srv_clamav.ScanFileTypes DATA EXECUTABLE ARCHIVE GIF JPEG MSOFFICE srv_clamav.MaxObjectSize 100M EOF   *Consult the ClamAV and c-icap documentation and customize the configuration and settings for ClamAV and c-icap (i.e. definition updates, ScanFileTypes, restricting c-icap access, etc.) for your deployment.   Just for fun run the following command to manually update the clamav database. /usr/bin/freshclam   Configure the ICAP Server to Start   This process can be completed a few different ways, for this example we are going to use the Event Alerting functionality of Traffic Manager to start i-cap server when the Application Firewall is started.   Save the following bash script (for this example start_icap.sh) on your computer. #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/c-icap #END   Upload the script via the Traffic Manager UI under Catalogs > Extra Files > Action Programs. (see Figure 1) Figure 1      Create a new event type (for this example named "Firewall Started") under System > Alerting > Manage Event Types. Select "appfirewallcontrolstarted: Application firewall started" and click update to save. (See Figure 2) Figure 2      Create a new action (for this example named "Start ICAP") under System > Alerting > Manage Actions. Select the "Program" radio button and click "Add Action" to save. (See Figure 3) Figure 3     Configure the "Start ICAP" Action Program to use the "start_icap.sh" script, and for this example we will adjust the timeout setting to 300. Click Update to save. (See Figure 4) Figure 4      Configure the Alert Mapping under System > Alerting to use the Event type and Action previously created. Click Update to save your changes. (See Figure 5) Figure 5      Restart the Application Firewall or reboot to automatically start i-cap server. Alternatively you can run the /usr/bin/c-icap command from the console or select "Update and Test" under the "Start ICAP" alert configuration page of the UI to manually start c-icap.   Configure the Web Application Firewall Within the Web Application Firewall UI, Add and configure the ICAPClientHandler using the following attribute and values.   icap_server_location - 127.0.0.1 icap_server_resource - /avscan   Testing Notes   Check the WAF application logs. Use Full logging for the Application configuration and enable_logging for the ICAPClientHandler. As with any system use full logging with caution, they could fill fast! Check the c-icap logs ( cat /var/log/c-icap/access.log & server.log). Note: Changing the /etc/c-icap/c-icap.conf "DebugLevel" value to 9 is useful for testing and recording to the /var/log/c-icap/server.log. *You may want to change this back to 1 when you are done testing. The Action Settings page in the Traffic Manager UI (for this example  Alerting > Actions > Start ICAP) also provides an "Update and Test" that allows you to trigger the action and start the c-icap server. Enable verbose logging for the "Start ICAP" action in the Traffic Manager for more information from the event mechanism. *You may want to change this setting back to disable when you are done testing.   Additional Information SteelApp Traffic Manager SteelApp Web App Firewall SteelApp Documentation RFC 3507 - Internet Content Adaptation Protocol (ICAP) The c-icap project Clam AntiVirus  
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A short document that describes the features and options of Stingray software editions on the AWS Marketplace
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PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard) is a pragmatic set of best practices and security measures that any organization must follow if they accept and handle cardholder data online. The standard encompasses network security, data protection, data encryption, system security, access control, ongoing monitoring and testing and security policy development. The PCI DSS standard requires organizations to develop policies and implement measures to ensure the secure management of credit card data and to impose controlled access to the networks over which customers’ card information is sent. Compliance with PCI DSS is mandatory for organizations that process credit card transactions online. Organizations who wish to achieve Merchant ID status must demonstrate a base level of compliance and are subject to regular audits.
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The Enforcer rule used by Stingray Application Firewall (SAF) will pass all requests to the local decider processes for inspection and security. For performance reasons, you may not want to inspect all requests.  For example, if some requests that are processed by your virtual server are sent to a cluster of servers hosting static content, and other requests are sent to a completely separate set of transaction servers, then it may make pragmatic sense to just inspect the requests that are routed to your transaction servers. You can whitelist a request by setting the a connection-local variable 'enforcer.whitelist' to '1'. Example The following rule should be applied to the Virtual Server prior to the SAF Enforcer rule.  It will whitelist requests only if they are using the HTTP "GET" method, do not have a Query String, and the file extension appears in the $fileTypes array #=-SAF Bypass Rule. This needs to be run as a request rule prior to the SAF Enforcer rule # Only Bypass GET Requests if ( http.getMethod() != "GET" )    break; # Only byPass requests with no Query String if ( http.getQueryString() )    break; # Array of file extensions to bypass $fileTypes = [ "css", "js", "png", "gif", "jpg" ]; # Pull out extension from path $extension = array.pop( string.split( http.getPath(), ".") ); # If the extension exists in our array, then set the whitelist flag if ( array.contains($fileTypes, $extension) ) {    connection.data.set("enforcer.whitelist", 1); }
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