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Pulse Secure vADC

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Installing Pulse vADC We have created dedicated installation and configuration guides for each type of deployment option, as part of the complete documentation set for Pulse Virtual Traffic Manager (Pulse vTM). There are a number of different deployment options, depending on whether you want to install vTM as a virtual appliance, in a cloud, on a bare-metal hardware appliance, or on a private server using a software installation. Choose the target platform here, and follow the link to the designated "Getting Started" guide:   Installing as a Virtual Appliance? Looking to run a trial on Microsoft Hyper-V, VMware, Xen, QVM/KEMU, or Oracle VM? Look here.   Installing in a Cloud? For information on installing in Google Cloud Platform, Amazon EC2, or Microsoft Azure, look here.   Installing on a Bare-Metal Hardware Appliance? To deploy the Pulse vTM appliance image on an approved server hardware platform, look here. For hardware compatibility information, see the Pulse vTM Hardware Compatibility List.   Installing as Pure Software? If you are installing onto a private server, or inside a VM running Linux or Solaris, look here.   Note that these links are valid for the Pulse vTM 18.2 software release. The most recent set of user documentation can always be found on https://www.pulsesecure.net/techpubs/ under the "Pulse vADC Solutions" section. This includes detailed configuration, REST API and TrafficScript programming guides.   (Copies of the "Getting Started" guides are attached to this article)  
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Pulse Secure vADC solutions are supported on Google Cloud Platform, with hourly billing options for applications that need to scale on-demand to match varying workloads. A range of Pulse Secure Virtual Traffic Manager (Pulse vTM) editions are available, including options for the Pulse vTM Developer Edition and Pulse Secure Virtual Web Application Firewall (Pulse vWAF), available as both a virtual machine and as a software installation on a Linux virtual machine.   This article describes how to quickly  create  a new Pulse   vTM instance through the Google Cloud Launcher. For additional information about the use and configuration of your Pulse vTM instance, see the product documentation available at www.pulsesecure.net/vadc-docs.   Launching a  Pulse   vTM Virtual Machine Instance   To launch a new instance of the  Pulse   vTM virtual machine, use the GCE Cloud Launcher Web site. Type the following URL into your Web browser:   https://cloud.google.com/launcher Browse or use the search tool to locate the Pulse Secure package applicable to your requirements, then click the package icon to see the   package detail screen.       To deploy a new   Pulse  vTM instance   1.  To start the process of deploying a new instance, click Launch on Compute Engine.   2.  Type an identifying name for the instance, select the image version, then select the desired geographic zone and machine type. Individual zones might have differing computing resources available and specific access restrictions. Contact your support provider for further details. 3.  Ensure the boot disk correspond to your computing resource requirements. Pulse Secure recommends not changing the default disk size as this might affect the performance of your Pulse vTM.   4.  By default, GCE creates firewall rules to allow HTTP and HTTPS traffic, and to allow access to the Web-based Pulse vTM Admin UI on TCP port 9090. To instead restrict access to these services, untick the corresponding firewall checkboxes.   Note: If you disable access to TCP port 9090, you cannot access the Pulse vTM Admin UI to configure the instance.   5.  If you want to use IP Forwarding with this instance, click More and set IP forwarding to "On".   6.  Pulse  vTM needs access to the Google Cloud Compute API, as indicated in the API Access section. Keep this option enabled to ensure your instance can function correctly.   7.  Click Deploy  to launch the Pulse vTM instance.   The Google Developer Console confirms that your Pulse vTM instance is being deployed.     Next Steps   After your new instance has been created, you can proceed to configure your Pulse vTM software through its Admin UI.   To access the Admin UI for a successfully deployed instance, click Log into the admin panel.       When you connect to the Admin UI for the first time, Pulse vTM presents the  Initial Configuration wizard . This wizard captures the networking, date/time, and basic system settings needed by your Pulse vTM software to operate normally.   For full details of the configuration process, and for instructions on performing various other administrative tasks, see the Cloud Services Installation and Getting Started Guide .
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In this release, Pulse vTM offers enhanced support for DevOps application teams looking for closer integration and automation in customized cloud deployments.
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In this release, Pulse Services Director offers enhanced Analytics support. Main highlights include enhanced chart formats and telemetry capability.  
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In this first article, Dmitri covers the basics of setting up Terraform for Pulse vADC.
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The Pulse Services Director vADC Analytics Application is intended to be both accessible and intuitive to use, with powerful graphic visualizations and insights into the traffic flows around your application. 
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Report on the most common events using the  Top Events  tab.
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In the final article, Dmitri completes the deployment of a complete Terraform project, including TrafficScript templates for dynamic services.
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In part 3, Dmitri shows how to use conditional logic to control resource creation.
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In part 2, we learn about Data Sources and Resources, and set up a vTM with a variable number of nodes.  
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The latest version of Pulse vTM v18.1 was released with a Terraform Provider for vTM
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Comparative Analysis views include Horseshoe and Timing Charts.
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The Analytics Application included with Pulse Services Director offers a unique Table View in the Explore functions.
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The Analytics Application included with Services Director displays a number of different types of metrics. The process by which metrics are generated and displayed varies between different types of graph, but the metric definition itself remains constant.
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The Analytics Application included with Pulse Services Director operates on a dataset which is made from individual records, each of which describes a single  transaction
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 Getting Started with Pulse vADC Welcome to Pulse Secure Application Delivery solutions! This article gives a quick five-step guide to how you can download Pulse Virtual Traffic Manager, including how to download the Developer Edition of the software, installing and configuring your first services, and then how to request a full-performance 30-day license key to experience the full power of Pulse Application Delivery solutions.   1. Download Pulse vADC The quickest way to get started with Pulse vADC is to  download the Developer Edition  of Pulse Virtual Traffic Manager. This will give you access to all the features and full programmability of Pulse vADC software, including add-on options for web application firewall (WAF) and web content optimization (WCO). The software needs no license key, but is limited to 1 Mbps/100 SSL tps throughput, so it can be used to explore the software and develop applications and interfaces.   2. Install Pulse vADC Grab either the Software or Virtual Appliance (VMware, Xen or OracleVM) installation and follow the instructions in the appropriate Getting Started guide. We have created dedicated installation and configuration guides for each type of environment, as part of the documentation set for Pulse Virtual Traffic Manager - choose the right environment, and install the software and you are ready to go.   (You can find the complete set of user documentation here)   3. Discover Pulse vADC These Pulse community pages include a wide range of resources to help you explore Pulse vADC solutions. From setting up simple services, through to remote management with REST and SOAP, and high-performance data-plane control using TrafficScript, Pulse gives you a comprehensive set of tools to differentiate and prioritise applications and services. See below for some good starting points!   4. Scale up Pulse vADC Ready to scale up your performance? When you are ready to move to the next level, you can request a 30-day evaluation license to test the full power of Pulse Virtual Traffic Manager. You will be sent a license key by email, which you can upload into the Developer Edition - then you can run complete performance and load testing in your own data center or cloud platforms. This evaluation license key will include Pulse Virtual Traffic Manager, again with add-on options for web application firewall (WAF) and web content optimization (WCO).     5. More to explore on the Pulse Community Load-balancing using Pulse Virtual Traffic Manager Back to Basics - What is a Traffic Manager , Anyway? Introduction to the Pulse vADC Architecture Global Load Balancing with Pulse vADC Examples of Pulse vADC in action And more ...    
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We live in a virtualized world. Virtualization has fundamentally changed the way that we build, deploy, manage and maintain applications. Servers used to be static, time consuming to provision, expensive to maintain and often over provisioned and under utilize. Virtualization tipped  
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by Aidan Clarke   Traditional IT applications were simple: they lived in one place, in your data center. If you wanted more capacity, you added more servers, storage and networks. If you wanted to make the application more reliable, you doubled it to make it highly available: you had one system running “active” - while the other system waited on “standby.” This concept of “redundancy” was simple, so long as you could buy two of everything, and were happy that only half of the infrastructure was active at any one time - not an efficient solution.   But modern applications need a modern approach to performance, security and reliability: which is why Brocade vADC approaches things differently, a software solution for a software world, where distributed applications need an “always-active” architecture.   We often hear from IT professionals that they used to avoid Active/Active architectures; for fear that performance would be compromised under failure. Our customers routinely deploy Brocade vADC in Active/Active, or even Active/Active/Active/Active solutions all the time: they can choose the right balance between node and cluster size, to optimize the availability, while reducing the size of the fault domain.     Similarly, high-availability architectures used to require that HA peers were installed as Layer 2 adjacent (ie: on the same network). These architectures simply don't work in today's clouds; for example, AWS availability zones, by their very design, are on different Layer 3 networks. In order to run a Layer 2 HA pair in Amazon AWS, you need to put your whole solution in a single AWS Availability zone - a practice that Amazon architects strongly discourage.   With Brocade vADC, if you can connect to each other via a network, then you can cluster your application. Which means that you can choose an availability architecture to suit your application - whether it lives in your data center, in a cloud, or both.   Get started with Brocade vADC today, our Developer Edition is free to download and try out in your test and development environment.     This article is part of a series, beginning with: Staying Afloat in the Application Economy More to Explore: Prev: One ADC Platform, Any Environment Next: Intelligent N+M Clustering   
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by Aidan Clarke   The Brocade vADC suite is designed to be flexible, extensible and portable software. Regardless of whether your applications run in the enterprise data center, in a private cloud, a public cloud or anything in between, Brocade's vADC can get you there.   Our solution was purpose-built for software deployment, and fits naturally into any virtual or cloud environment: and it was the first full functioning ADC solution available on VMWare, and has been in public clouds since the beginning - originally named Zeus ZXTM, it was launched on Amazon EC2 in 2009. The Brocade vADC platform only needs one simple thing to operate: a platform that can run Linux on an Intel platform. If you can do that, you can run Brocade vADC.     Brocade vADC offers native images for Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Engine, Rackspace, Joyent, Sunguard and many more - and it is also available as a Virtual Appliance for VMware, HyperV, Xen Server, KVM and OracleVM.   Furthermore, Brocade Services Director can manage vADC workloads in all of these environments simultaneously: our customers can deploy Brocade Services Director in an enterprise Data Centre (DC) and use it to manage workloads in both the DC and the cloud at the same time.   Simply put, no matter where your applications run, Brocade vADC can be right there with them. And no matter where you go, it's the same vADC software ensuring your applications are Available, Scalable, Fast and Secure. Get started with Brocade vADC today, our Developer Edition is free to download and try out in your test and development environment.     This article is part of a series, beginning with: Staying Afloat in the Application Economy More to Explore: Prev: Right-Size for Capacity Next: Active/Active Clustering for High Availability  
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by Aidan Clarke and Paul Wallace   Today’s applications are built for innovation and customer experience, and it can be hard to predict how they will evolve if they hit a rapid growth curve. Which makes it very hard to plan ahead for capacity, especially when you don't know how your systems will scale under increased workloads.   Traditionally, IT organizations would need to plan far, far ahead. Not just for systems resources such as CPU, memory, storage and networks, but also for software licensing for larger-scale systems. This used to very complex, as software sizing often depended on workloads: you might need to translate your projected capacity (guess) into the numbers of CPUs required (guess) in order to calculate the number and type of software licensing required (another guess).   In order to hit the projected workloads, you might need more CPUs, for which you might need to buy bigger licenses. And just in case, you might round up to make sure that your application did not hit the CPU license limit at peak periods.     With Brocade vADC, we have taken some of the guesswork out of capacity planning. We don't limit the number of CPUs you can run on an instance. If you need more horsepower, simply add more CPUs to the workload and you can scale up to meet demand, up to the licensed capacity you have selected.   With a pure software architecture, Brocade vADC can monitor throughput and capacity, while optimizing the available CPU and memory. So if you provision a vADC with 1 Gbps ADC capacity, then it will only be limited by the available CPU/memory/networking. You can add complex business rules, deep security scanning, compression and SSL/TLS security, and you will still be able to deliver 1 Gbps throughput so long as the system has enough resources.   So while traditional IT architectures meant that you had to over-size your systems - sometimes you had to install 10 Gbps of capacity just to run a 1 Gbps workload - with Brocade vADC, you just need to provision enough CPU and memory to right-size your workload.   Get started with Brocade vADC today, our Developer Edition is free to download and try out in your test and development environment.     This article is part of a series, beginning with: Staying Afloat in the Application Economy More to Explore: Prev: Agile Licensing for Agile Applications Next: One ADC Platform, Any Environment   
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